bestrooftalkever:

party-wok:

julierthanyou:

clambistro:

Ahh, it’s back

i have disproportionately strong feelings about this.

every time i say “nah i’m not gonna watch it again.” BUT I STILL DO EVERY TIME.

YEAUGH

(Source: videohall)

dutchster:

this is easily one of the coolest things i have ever seen
THEY’RE WALKING ON ICE. BUT ON THE OTHER SIDE. UNDERWATER

That awful moment when you learn that this wasn’t scripted. That Will Smith’s character was actually supposed to brush off the whole thing, but Will’s father actually had left him when he was younger and he just fell apart on the set and the hug at the end was from one actor to another, not one character to another…

(Source: smiles-sunsets-and-sarcasm)

victran:

awesomeness2:

12gauge-ghost:

coolpsychosexy:

I hope someone bought theses two dinner

Now that’s trust.

And stupid.

quite common for SOF guys to have these “trust” drills. often to condition them before going into a live fire shoot house where there will be plenty of their own sweeping into each other’s sectors upon movement and execution of the raid or violence of action. 
but dont get me wrong, this is after years of conditioning and training to achieve such skill sets. these operators are finely tuned to do such things with mechanical efficiency. 
when fighting in close quarters, this is a reality. that there will be guys (both good and bad) being crossed into various sectors. the risk is high but the violence of action is like no other

victran:

awesomeness2:

12gauge-ghost:

coolpsychosexy:

I hope someone bought theses two dinner

Now that’s trust.

And stupid.

quite common for SOF guys to have these “trust” drills. often to condition them before going into a live fire shoot house where there will be plenty of their own sweeping into each other’s sectors upon movement and execution of the raid or violence of action. 

but dont get me wrong, this is after years of conditioning and training to achieve such skill sets. these operators are finely tuned to do such things with mechanical efficiency. 

when fighting in close quarters, this is a reality. that there will be guys (both good and bad) being crossed into various sectors. the risk is high but the violence of action is like no other

(Source: relentless-soul)

caramichele:

goodasgould:

Best Parks and Rec outtake ever. Possibly one of the funniest moments of any show ever. This cast is perfection.

one of my favorite things in the world

(Source: prekrasnoe-mngnovenie)

ithinkdeeply:

victoriavai:

samirows:

justinverlanderspaycheck:

tennesseantraditions:

im-fivebyfive:

dreams-and-hard-realities:

espeonsilverfire2:

findingschmomo:

browncoat-named-cauthon:

excitabletortoise:

god bless america

I hope this the last remaining photos of our presidents

Is no one going to talk about Ronald McDonald fighting in Clinton’s background.

I’m not even american and I will reblog these anyday.

I don’t think I’ve ever seen a more American post.

Never not reblog

I love the fact that Bill’s pants are undone

Mericuh

Okay but wheatley

God bless the USA

Whats not in the textbook

(Source: 8bitmonkey)

andnowdeepthoughts:

"Salute Seen Around the World"
Army Ranger Joshua Hargis returns the salute of the Ranger Regiment Commander after being awarded the Purple Heart.  Hargis was injured in a suicide blast in Afghanistan.  

Josh was seriously wounded as you know and survived for almost two hours after his injury before arriving to the hospital. Josh was immediately pushed through a series of surgeries and emerged hours later into an intensive care unit here at our base in Afghanistan.
Despite being in intense pain and mental duress, Josh remained alert and compassionate to the limited Rangers that were allowed to visit him bedside. Prior to Josh being moved to Germany for his eventual flight to America, we conducted a ceremony to award him with the Purple Heart for wounds received in action.
A simple ceremony, you can picture a room full of Rangers, leaders, doctors, and nurses surrounding his bedside while the Ranger Regimental Commander pinned the Purple Heart to his blanket. During the presentation the Commander publishes the official orders verbally and leaned over Josh to thank him for his sacrifice.
Josh, whom everybody in the room (over 50 people) assumed to be unconscious, began to move his right arm under the blanket in a diligent effort to salute the Commander as is customary during these ceremonies. Despite his wounds, wrappings, tubes, and pain, Josh fought the doctor who was trying to restrain his right arm and rendered the most beautiful salute any person in that room had ever seen. I cannot impart on you the level of emotion that poured through the intensive care unit that day.
Grown men began to weep and we were speechless at a gesture that speak volumes about Josh’s courage and character. The picture, which we believe belongs on every news channel and every news paper is attached. I have it hanging above my desk now and will remember it as the single greatest event I have witnessed in my ten years in the Army.

Love of Country, done correctly.  

andnowdeepthoughts:

"Salute Seen Around the World"

Army Ranger Joshua Hargis returns the salute of the Ranger Regiment Commander after being awarded the Purple Heart.  Hargis was injured in a suicide blast in Afghanistan.  

Josh was seriously wounded as you know and survived for almost two hours after his injury before arriving to the hospital. Josh was immediately pushed through a series of surgeries and emerged hours later into an intensive care unit here at our base in Afghanistan.

Despite being in intense pain and mental duress, Josh remained alert and compassionate to the limited Rangers that were allowed to visit him bedside. Prior to Josh being moved to Germany for his eventual flight to America, we conducted a ceremony to award him with the Purple Heart for wounds received in action.

A simple ceremony, you can picture a room full of Rangers, leaders, doctors, and nurses surrounding his bedside while the Ranger Regimental Commander pinned the Purple Heart to his blanket. During the presentation the Commander publishes the official orders verbally and leaned over Josh to thank him for his sacrifice.

Josh, whom everybody in the room (over 50 people) assumed to be unconscious, began to move his right arm under the blanket in a diligent effort to salute the Commander as is customary during these ceremonies. Despite his wounds, wrappings, tubes, and pain, Josh fought the doctor who was trying to restrain his right arm and rendered the most beautiful salute any person in that room had ever seen. I cannot impart on you the level of emotion that poured through the intensive care unit that day.

Grown men began to weep and we were speechless at a gesture that speak volumes about Josh’s courage and character. The picture, which we believe belongs on every news channel and every news paper is attached. I have it hanging above my desk now and will remember it as the single greatest event I have witnessed in my ten years in the Army.

Love of Country, done correctly.  

charmedandforgotten:

reckoner42:

magnus-thegreat-redundancy:

I believe that ever american should at least watch this monologue from The Newsroom

and this is when I became a fan. it was interesting seeing how the news gets their news. 

THANK YOU.